Brutally accurate media placement.

The Glass Man of Stevenage.

Rather unkindly, some people refer to people who wear Google Glass as ‘Glassholes’. But then you don’t see many about.
But I see one one. Most mornings. We share a train (with a few hundred other people).
There he is on the platform as we wait for the train. And every day he’s wearing his Glass.
Google Glass

Look how much fun it is to wear them/it.

I don’t pay him close attention but I’ve never actually seen him using them. They just sit on his face, so to speak.
Why does he wear them/it?
Force of habit? Will he need them later on and if he doesn’t wear them he’ll forget them?
I’m not going to judge him. It’s his right to wear them. Personally, I wouldn’t choose to sport them every day – and certainly not if I wasn’t going to use them
The other week I got off the tube at Victoria and to my surprise he hopped out of the driver’s cab. So no doubt he works for TfL and cadged a lift with a mate.
So does he drive Tube trains and film the tunnels as he goes? I know SNCF were trialing Google Glass to speed up ticket checking – a good idea in principle – but this is a conundrum that baffles me every morning.

East Coast goes Virginal.

The first hint of this came last night on the way home. Not a paint job but the wifi login page. Still the familiar East Coast logo, but hello – someone’s slung a Virgin logo on the front.

And this morning the effect is complete with a brand new bright red livery.

So what does it mean for us commuters? Fares going up, usually…

The times, they are appearing on Stevenage platform.

Great news for my eyes. I can now see train information from my normal waiting spot on Platform 1.

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No, my eyesight hasn’t improved; they installed new displays along the platform so none of us have to squint into the distance any more.

To be fair, Stevenage has undergone some big improvements in the time since I’ve been commuting through (and parking) here.

When did they install them? Not sure – didn’t notice them until this morning. It’s my eyes you know…

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Big news! Little Waitrose.

I was complimented on this blog yesterday – which, niche as it is – doesn’t happen very often. I immediately felt guilty. It’s been neglected, passed over in favour of things that aren’t Parking In Stevenage. So this morning gave me the perfect opportunity to right that wrong.

King’s Cross has finally completed its last phase of gentrification. That final piece of the jigsaw is in place. That key indicator is now present. That beacon of ‘honestly-priced goods’ for the middle classes and above is nestled in the armpit between the ticket office and the currency exchange. Do you need a different currency to shop in Waitrose? I thought it was just accents. Maybe you can change those green charity discs for Fortnum’s vouchers…?

This, according to Jackie Wharton, director of convenience for Waitrose, makes me a “transumer” (*heart sinks*) just by walking past it. A collision of transport and consumer. I guess colliding ‘consumer’ with ‘commuter’ was a real bastard. Consummuter? Commusumer?

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So if you’re travelling from the family pile to the big smoke or simply hammered and starving for some organic kale and free range cous cous, your prayers have been answered.

Little Waitrose, King's Cross

A ‘hustle alarm’ is a thing.

Unfortunately this alarm does not signal a highly sophisticated scam conducted by a gang of lovable, wise-cracking transatlantic con artists on an unsuspecting but unsympathetic ‘mark’.

On your marks...

On your marks…

It is in fact the alarm that sounds a few seconds before the doors shut so that staff can laugh at travellers weighed down with kids and luggage as they make a last ditch attempt to board the train before they become one with the doors as they close slowly and determinedly on them.

Sadly, I’m unable to attach a photo of this sound at present.

The Perfect Storm – London-style.

As if a tube strike wasn’t enough, a decidedly un-British monsoon and a power surge in New Southgate tunnel conspired to hamper my commute home. Having to walk to King’s Cross as there were no buses due for ages and you can imagine the crush when they eventually arrived/sailed straight past. So then waiting for the 6.44, at 6.44 there was no sign of the front 4 coaches that always arrive separately and join uncomfortably.

So very cleverly, avoiding the crush of the people waiting on Platform 9, I snuck round the top and back down a deserted Platform 8 and took this pic.

Vanishing Point

Vanishing Point

So then checking my National Rail app on my phone, I saw the platform had been announced for the 6.53 – Platform 7. I could walk to the ticket barrier end and round that way, but I had the brainwave of getting the lift up to the walkway and down. Easy. Except a few others had the same idea and when the 2 guys and their very muscular dog got in with us, the computer lady said we had to reduce the weight. It took a little for the 2 chaps with the dog to work out what this meant, but the penny dropped and they wandered off.

So we left nearly on time and we seemed to be home and (getting) dry. Then the main carriage lights went off and we were reduced to a crawl. The driver, bless him, used the tannoy to tell us a power surge in the tunnel had buggered the train. Luckily it seemed to get fixed and we carried on… Look no wonder I don’t post on this blog any more. So tedious! Yes I KNOW that was the point…

Premier Inn re-creates King’s Cross in Lego, to mark “Lego Movie” launch.

We thought we recognised that grid/structure working its way up from the ground. The main concourse at King’s Cross – there it is! It’s part of a marketing coup from the makers of Lego Movie, persuading advertisers to run Lego versions of their commercials. Premier Inn aren’t alone, by any means. Confused.com and BT are among the ads going all stop-frame and bricky for a wall-to-wall Lego fest during an ad-break in Sundays’ Dancing On Ice.

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King’s Cross narrowly missed the Lego treatment a while back when it’s illustrious neighbour, St Pancras was immortalised in Lego. 18 months and 150,000 bricks, that’s all it took.

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First Capital Connect – still running round in circles.

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Hardly surprising the engine’s overrunning. It doesn’t know if it’s coming or going…

Smile, you’re on CCTV.

They’ve recently installed CCTV screens at Stevenage station, so if you’re that way inclined you can watch Stevenage station LIVE AND EXCLUSIVE only at Stevenage station.

If you glance up you can watch yourself as you come through the barriers.

I’m not a big fan. For me it’s like a premonition of your own death on the news. “These are the last pictures of the victim alive before he was snatched up by a griffin and spontaneously combusted…”

That’s a self-fulfilling prophecy just waiting happen.

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